HREDO - Human Resource and Environment Development Organization

HREDO - Human Resource and Environment Development Organization


Aimed for Sustainable Rural Development through Women Empowerment

Our priority is to empower human resources at the grass root level and promote sustainable environmental development

Aimed for Sustainable Rural Development through Women Empowerment

Our priority is to empower human resources at the grass root level and promote sustainable environmental development

About Us

Our staff & volunteers

Our staff & volunteers comprise of personnel from both urban and rural background to bind the theory & reality

Our history

HREDO was founded as a non profit organisation by renowned Agriculturist M A Samad Talukder with a vision for women empowerment as well as make it a sustainable environmental project

Our mission

Aimed for sustainable rural development

The Black Bengal Farming

Breed Introduction

Black Bengal is the only true breed of goat in Bangladesh. It is generally farmed for its meat. 

The breed is short in size; reaching a height of 50-60 cm and length of 80-90 cm. Their ears are short, pointy and horizontal to the ground. Females have shorter, thinner and vertical horns, which reaches length of 5-6 cm. Males have relatively longer horns that are bigger, thicker and curved backwards. They have short and smooth skin. Adult males weighs around 25-40 kg while the adult females reach around 20-40 kg.

Females usually gives 200-300 ml of milk a day for 2-3 months per year.

One can get 45-55% meat of the total weight of the goat. For example, a goat weighing 20 kg can produce 11 kg of meat at maximum.

The weight to hide ratio is 3:50. A goat weighing 20 kg can produce 1.2-1.4 kg of raw hide.

The females give birth to more than one kids twice every 12-14 months. But in 80% cases they give birth to a kid only at the first time.

Rationale for Goat Farming

Since early civilization husbandry is a major part of human life. A little scientific approach for animal farming can make a significant impact in the lives of the women and their families at the grass root level. They can engage themselves in goat farming by utilizing the areas around their home. Thus goat farming can play a vital role in women empowerment.

Aim of the Programme

The primary objective for the programme is to train the rural under privileged women and thus empower them by building their self-confidence. 

General Directions

  • Let the women know the reason behind poverty
  • Help the hidden potential of the rural women
  • Let the poor rural women to know about their demand, asset and needs
  • Organize the under privileged women so that they can learn about goat farming and apply that knowledge
  • Train the women about farming Black Bengal Goats that includes the veterinary training
  • Encourage them to make micro-farms at family capacity
  • The pious Muslims in Bangladesh donate every now and then. These donations can be utilized effectively by goat farming  

Advantages of Goat Farming

  • Goats are smaller animals. The cost of their feeds, shelter and other necessities are relatively low
  • Goats breeds relatively faster than cows
  • Goat stool is an excellent ingredient for compost fertilizer. Every goat produces an average of 200 kg stool per year
  • Although goats give less milk and produce less meat; the food value of both of them are relatively high. In addition, the milk and meat are easy on the intestine of women and children
  • The hide is a major source of leather export from Bangladesh
  • Goat farming is easy to fund. In Bangladesh, many pious people donates goats to the poor. These goats could be reached to the right people through this project
  • The farmers will be trained to farm the Black Bengal effectively by training them on every aspect  

Contact Us

Better yet, drop us a line!

We would love to hear from our stakeholders, so feel free to visit during normal business hours.

HREDO

House - 55 (2nd floor), Road - 6, Block - C, Banani, Dhaka

+8801715038911

Hours

Sunday - Thursday: 10am - 6pm

Friday & Saturday: Closed